Alum’s Company Tackles Traumatic Brain Injuries

When it comes to traumatic brain injuries, the time it takes for a patient to get treatment is especially critical. Accordingly, BrainScope, a company whose CEO is Washington and Lee alumnus Michael Singer, of the Class of 1984, has developed Ahead EU-100, a new tool to quickly assess brain function, and introduced it in the United Kingdom.

A news release issued by the company said that  “the portable, non-invasive device uses product miniaturization and advanced signal processing methods to assess and categorize brain electrical activity and patterns related to brain injury . . . The system has a handheld device with software and algorithms, a disposable electrode headset and a Web-based capability for centralized storage and review of patient data.”

The release went on to quote Michael: “With approximately 1 million people each year attending the accident and emergency department in the U.K. following head injuries, we believe that . . . this product . . . will provide a valuable tool for clinicians in making informed decisions for triage, treatment and care of patients with suspected head injuries.”

With increased attention to head injuries in sports, such a device would seem to be especially valuable. One reports indicates that an estimated 1.6 million to 3.8 million sports-related traumatic brain injuries occur each year.

Prior to joining BrainScope in November 2008, Michael had been president of Revolution Health Investments, Revolution L.L.C. He initiated, negotiated and completed several transactions that together created the Revolution Health Network and was instrumental in the merger of Revolution Health with Waterfront Media.

He has also been an executive at Microsoft Corp., reporting directly to the CTO, and was the CFO, executive vice president of corporate development and a board member for Data Critical Corp. in Seattle.

Michael received an M.A. from the Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs at Syracuse University and a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics.



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